Glossary

I’ve found that one of my biggest challenges in making a mobile game is that I can’t use all available resources simply because I cannot understand them. Articles, tutorials, websites, all the places I’ve visited on my mobile game journey seem to speak a different language. I’m calling this “computer language”. All of them use nouns most people don’t encounter in their daily life. When three or four of these “computer language” nouns are used in a sentence, many of them relating explaining one another, trying to comprehend what it going on becomes extremely difficult and tiresome. After a while, I’ve gotten used to many of these words, have a vague idea of what they mean, and use them often in my posts.

However, if someone who isn’t familiar with these words comes to my blog, they’ll be completely lost and feel just like I did reading all those foreign articles and tutorials. The goal of this blog is to take a beginner like me through the steps of making a mobile game and explain it as simply as possible. If they don’t understand the “computer language”, then we’re right back where we started!

That’s why I’m making this glossary. As I post, I’ll be adding new words that I come across often and use in my posts with a simple explanation of what they mean and how they relate to the creation of a mobile game. That way, you can become familiar with “computer language” and use a variety of resources online with ease .

*This page is still in development. Words without definitions will soon be updated*


Application Programming Interface (API)

Application

Back End

C++

Code

Debug

Front End

Integrated Development Environment (IDE)

Interface

Language

Lua — Lua is a fast scripting language developed by a team at the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janiero. Marmalade Quick uses Lua as a language to develop lightweight 2D games. This is the programming language I’ll be using to make most of my game.

Platform

Program

Software Development Kit (SDK) — A Software Development Kit is a program you can download with a set of tools built for developing software (hence the name).  The software you develop is an application often aimed at a certain platform. Some SDKs are built for the amateur game designer, without the complications of code but rather a simple interface with pre-built icons and movements. These are often limited in their abilities and don’t have many customization options. The Unreal Engine SDK, or Unreal Development Kit, is a good example of this. Other SDKs allow for the building of code, testing, debugging, and complete customization of your application. Often these allow you to access the souce code. These are also a lot more complicated to use. The Unreal Engine 4 package would be an example of this, as it allows you to access the C++ source code of Unreal Engine.

I’m using the Marmalade SDK and within it the specific tool Marmalade Quick. This gives me access to a place where I can code my game in the language Lua, a game simulator, and a deployer to many devices.

Test

User

Visual Studio

XCode


 

If you don’t understand the definition of a word, or believe a definition is incorrect, please leave a comment!

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